Human Rights: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Book review

By Teodora-Maria Daghie, University of Bucharest

Human Rights: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Human rights are considered universal, meaning that they should be applied regardless of any borders, ethnicity, skin colour, sex, language, religion, sexual orientation, political opinion or social status (etc). They also state that all people are born free and equal in dignity and have equal rights. At the global level we have achieved a Universal Declaration of Human Rights and various UN conventions, including those dealing with genocide, discrimination and gender rights. Freeman’s work…

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Issue 9:1

By Erfaun Norooz

Libya, Resolution 1973 and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P)

ABSTRACT: This article sheds light on the intervention in Libya and the Responsibility to Protect on the behalf of the state and the global community. The response of the Libyan regime to the 2011 uprising as well as an assessment of the use of the R2P principle is discussed. Based on the tangible examples of the Libyan intervention, I will highlight the criteria posed by the R2P doctrine and Just War theory to discuss the legitimacy of the Libyan intervention. Keywords: Libya, R2P,…

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Issue 9:1

By Francis M. Kabosha

From Peacekeeping to Peace Enforcement and Back to Peacebuilding Dilemmas: Is there A Growing Insecurity of International Security?

ABSTRACT: Since its creation in 1945, the United Nations (UN) has steadily increased the aspiration and scale of its peace and security agenda in conflict-affected countries. The evolution and development of peacekeeping is viewed as a global tool for achieving its aspiration for international peace and security. Yet, there are problems of transitioning from peacekeeping to peacebuilding because perceptions of local populations about the conflict itself are becoming an integral part of the…

Politics in the Age of Austerity

Book review

By Jan Kovář (The Institute of International Relations Prague)

Politics in the Age of Austerity

  Democratic-capitalist governments are increasingly facing restraints as they endeavour to reconcile the conflicting interests and demands on public policy of two competing constituencies: the people and “markets.” The fiscal crisis and the resulting rise of the austerity state further deepen these dilemmas. But, what is the impact of the rise of the austerity state and deteriorating public finances on democracy and political participation? Will democracy be able to continue to promote…

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Issue 9:1

By Přemysl Rosůlek

The Issue of Madhism within Shia Ideology and Ahmadinejad’s Doctrine

ABSTRACT: I will attempt to argue in this paper that the rise of Mahdism within Shi’a political Islam during Ahmadinejad’s era did not lead to a significant break with previous development. Relevance of Mahdism within Shi’a politicized and ideologized Islam in Iran has been on the rise since the second half of 20th century. The issue occurred in Shi’a political philosophy and theory prior to the Islamic revolution in Iran. In the post-revolutionary period, Mahdism became an inherent part of the…

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Issue 9:1

By Iveta Hlouchová

Afghanistan as a Potential Export Market for Czech Companies: Implications for the Privatisation of Security in the Czech Republic

ABSTRACT: To Follow Keywords: Afghanistan, Czech, export, hybridisation, private sector, private military and security companies, risk reduction Digital copy will be available soon.

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Issue 9:1

By Lukasz Worldiczek

Security, Inc.: Privatising Internal Security in Post-Communist Poland

ABSTRACT:The question of how and when authority diminishes in states has been a persistent feature of international relations and the political sciences for several decades. The issue is often referred to as ‘governance without a government’ and tries to understand systems of thick and thin sovereignty. This work adds to the literature – pertaining to Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), and Poland more specifically – by providing some basic definition-rooted problems such as the public-private…

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Issue 9:1

By Karina Moreno Saldivar and Byron E. Price

Private Prisons and the Emerging Immigrant Market: Implications for Security Governance

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this work is to examine the role and involvement of the two largest private prisons corporations in the US, Corrections Corporations of America (CCA) and The GEO Group, Inc., in the immigration policymaking arena. Recent news reported the role of private prison industry in sponsoring and drafting Arizona’s immigration bill, Senate Bill 1070. Following Arizona’s SB 1070, 36 state legislatures proposed copycat bills. This is alarming because immigrants and noncitizens…

Issue 9:1

By Jason Ireland and Caroline Varin

PMSCs and the Regulatory Environment in Iraq Post-2011

ABSTRACT: This article explores the security demands and regulatory changes in Iraq since 2011 that have required the private security industry to adapt its corporate strategy. Drawing from cutting-edge primary research, including interviews with contractors and with multinational clients in Iraq and the United Kingdom, the article highlights the impact of Western corporate values and government requirements on the operational ability and effectiveness of PMSCs in Iraq. So far, the literature…

European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World

Book review

By Andriy Tyushka (College of Europe, Natolin Campus)

European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World

The flurry of changes to the EU’s internal and external environments produced a demand for thorough analytical accounts of the Union’s challenges as an international actor aiming to imprint the world order. Unsurprisingly, a robust scholarship of EU foreign policy analysis has mushroomed in the last decade. Among them, Karen E. Smith’s European Union Foreign Policy in a Changing World stands out for its distinctive focus—searching for the rationale behind the EU’s empowerment and its goal…

Peace operations, 2nd edition

Book review

By Adisa Avdić- Küsmüş (Metropolitan University Prague)

Peace operations, 2nd edition

The advent of peacekeeping in the mid-20th century was a significant shift in strategy for conflict resolution.  The failure of collective security under the League of Nations pushed for finding more effective ways for dealing with conflicts. The idea of deploying forces to war torn areas with the purpose of limiting violence gradually evolved and resulted in the establishment of large, complex and costly missions around the world. But how did such operations evolve? Who organises them and how…

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eContribution

By Abubakar Siddique and Yousaf Zadran for RFE/RL

Islamic State Rears Its Head In Afghan Region Bordering Central Asia

Afghan officials have confirmed the presence of Islamic State (IS) militants in the northeastern province of Kunduz, which borders Tajikistan and is in close proximity to Uzbekistan. Provincial Governor Mohammad Omar Safi told Radio Free Afghanistan on March 3 that Kunduz residents have spotted IS militants in various districts on Afghanistan's border with Tajikistan. "The residents of some parts of Char Dara, Imam Sahib and Archi districts have spotted IS militants," he said. "They have seen…

Politics of Energy and Memory between the Baltic States and Russia

Book review

By Anya Gromilova (Metropolitan University Prague)

Politics of Energy and Memory between the Baltic States and Russia

The bookThe Politics of Energy and Memory between the Baltic States and Russia offers as in-depth and penetrative look into the three former Soviet Baltic Republics’ foreign policy towards Russia from 1994 to present day. Grigas focuses primarily on the domestic variables of policy making in Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania in order to dismantle the conventional approach to studies of the Baltic-Russian relations. The author argues against simplistic narratives such as the common perception that…

The End of American World Order

Book review

By Jaume Castan Pinos (University of Southern Denmark)

The End of American World Order

In The End of American World Order, Amitav Acharya engages in core debates of International Relations; hegemony and world polarity. This is, needless to say, an extremely complex subject, and consequently, a formidable academic challenge. Perhaps the main strength of the book is that Acharya is not intimidated by the daunting challenges he faces. One of the main virtues of the book is that his deconstruction of the American World Order (AWO) myths is serene and rigorous without resorting to…

Editors desk

By Mitchell Belfer

The Costs of Violence in Bahrain

In the two months since Bahrain’s parliamentary elections, the country has witnessed dozens of concentrated, violent demonstrations and a spate of bombing attacks that have caused death, injury and the destruction of public and private property. Yet, the country remains on the receiving end of a loud chorus of international condemnations. It is accused of a variety of things ranging from human rights violations, the alleged torturing of political prisoners, encouraging sectarianism and…

eContribution

By Anya Gromilova

On Oscars, Russian Politics and Leviathan

  Can you pull in the leviathan with a fishhook or tie down his tongue with a rope? - Tanakh, Job 41:1 - 34 The start of 2015 was as restless as ever for a Russia whose economy faces the multiple challenges of surviving under increasingly robust sanctions coupled with ever-falling oil prices and the ruble’s nose dive. Yet the country persists with its efforts to flex its foreign policy muscles. Whether to consider such efforts fruitful is very controversial and have sparked numerous…

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eContribution

By Nikol Chumová

Germany Redraws Ethical Boundaries as Buchenwald Re-opens

Welcome to Germany! Here’s a place for you to stay—Buchenwald. Don’t like it? Another former death camp may be your alternative, so choose wisely. Nearly 70 years after their inmates were liberated, Germany’s concentration camps may soon be filled again—with asylum seekers. Tasteless as this is, some are arguing it’s time to get over the old taboos. This raises the question; is this a terrible mistake born of desperation or some final victory over fascism? Current housing facilities for…

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eContribution

By Daniela Zordova

A Take on Slovakia’s Same-Sex Referendum

*** Do you agree only the union of a man and a woman can be called marriage? *** Do you agree that it should not be permitted for same-sex couples to adopt children? *** Should parents have the right to remove their children from sex education in schools?Last Saturday (07 February), Slovakia held an absurd referendum worthy of praise from only the most religiously political regimes and yet reflects to the European and international publics the mentality of Slovaks when it comes to social…

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eContribution

By Abubakar Siddique for RFE/RL

Are The Taliban Terrorists?

Many were surprised when a White House spokesman recently called the Afghan Taliban an "armed insurgency" and refrained from calling the hardline militant group terrorists a month after the United States ended combat operations in Afghanistan. The United States lost more than 2,000 soldiers in its 13-year war against the Taliban after it led an international coalition to topple their regime in Afghanistan in late 2001. The Taliban were accused of harboring Al-Qaeda, and a day after thousands…

Editors desk

By Mitchell Belfer

Announcement Regarding the Withdrawal of 'Macedonian Ambassador's Son "Kidnapped in Prague"'

Dear Readers, Please note that a commentary article entitled, 'Macedonian Ambassador's Son "Kidnapped in Prague,"' (31 October 2012) by Aneta Speldova was withdrawn in January 2013 following new information that challenged the original assertions by the former Macedonian Ambassador to the Czech Republic. The decision to withdraw the article in 2013 was taken by CEJISS management without outside consultation. CEJISS asserts that it bears no responsibility for republications of its materials.…

eContribution

By Abubakar Siddique, Qasim Khan Mandokhel and Ghulam Ghaus for RFE/RL

Pakistan's Minority Provinces Oppose Changes To China Trade Route

A series of major Chinese-financed infrastructure and development projects expected to change Pakistan's economic landscape has run into controversy. Leaders from two of Pakistan's minority provinces have called on the country's dominant eastern province of Punjab to refrain from changing the route of the China-Pak Economic Corridor. The 2,000-kilometer rail and road link will connect western China to Pakistan's newly developed Arabian Sea seaport, Gwadar. Politicians in the underdeveloped…

2015 - Volume 9, Issue 1