Peace operations, 2nd edition

Book review

By Adisa Avdić- Küsmüş (Metropolitan University Prague)

Peace operations, 2nd edition

The advent of peacekeeping in the mid-20th century was a significant shift in strategy for conflict resolution.  The failure of collective security under the League of Nations pushed for finding more effective ways for dealing with conflicts. The idea of deploying forces to war torn areas with the purpose of limiting violence gradually evolved and resulted in the establishment of large, complex and costly missions around the world. But how did such operations evolve? Who organises them and how…

eContribution

By Abubakar Siddique and Yousaf Zadran for RFE/RL

Islamic State Rears Its Head In Afghan Region Bordering Central Asia

Afghan officials have confirmed the presence of Islamic State (IS) militants in the northeastern province of Kunduz, which borders Tajikistan and is in close proximity to Uzbekistan. Provincial Governor Mohammad Omar Safi told Radio Free Afghanistan on March 3 that Kunduz residents have spotted IS militants in various districts on Afghanistan's border with Tajikistan. "The residents of some parts of Char Dara, Imam Sahib and Archi districts have spotted IS militants," he said. "They have seen…

Politics of Energy and Memory between the Baltic States and Russia

Book review

By Anya Gromilova (Metropolitan University Prague)

Politics of Energy and Memory between the Baltic States and Russia

The bookThe Politics of Energy and Memory between the Baltic States and Russia offers as in-depth and penetrative look into the three former Soviet Baltic Republics’ foreign policy towards Russia from 1994 to present day. Grigas focuses primarily on the domestic variables of policy making in Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania in order to dismantle the conventional approach to studies of the Baltic-Russian relations. The author argues against simplistic narratives such as the common perception that…

The End of American World Order

Book review

By Jaume Castan Pinos (University of Southern Denmark)

The End of American World Order

In The End of American World Order, Amitav Acharya engages in core debates of International Relations; hegemony and world polarity. This is, needless to say, an extremely complex subject, and consequently, a formidable academic challenge. Perhaps the main strength of the book is that Acharya is not intimidated by the daunting challenges he faces. One of the main virtues of the book is that his deconstruction of the American World Order (AWO) myths is serene and rigorous without resorting to…

Editors desk

By Mitchell Belfer

The Costs of Violence in Bahrain

In the two months since Bahrain’s parliamentary elections, the country has witnessed dozens of concentrated, violent demonstrations and a spate of bombing attacks that have caused death, injury and the destruction of public and private property. Yet, the country remains on the receiving end of a loud chorus of international condemnations. It is accused of a variety of things ranging from human rights violations, the alleged torturing of political prisoners, encouraging sectarianism and…

eContribution

By Anya Gromilova

On Oscars, Russian Politics and Leviathan

  Can you pull in the leviathan with a fishhook or tie down his tongue with a rope? - Tanakh, Job 41:1 - 34 The start of 2015 was as restless as ever for a Russia whose economy faces the multiple challenges of surviving under increasingly robust sanctions coupled with ever-falling oil prices and the ruble’s nose dive. Yet the country persists with its efforts to flex its foreign policy muscles. Whether to consider such efforts fruitful is very controversial and have sparked numerous…

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eContribution

By Nikol Chumová

Germany Redraws Ethical Boundaries as Buchenwald Re-opens

Welcome to Germany! Here’s a place for you to stay—Buchenwald. Don’t like it? Another former death camp may be your alternative, so choose wisely. Nearly 70 years after their inmates were liberated, Germany’s concentration camps may soon be filled again—with asylum seekers. Tasteless as this is, some are arguing it’s time to get over the old taboos. This raises the question; is this a terrible mistake born of desperation or some final victory over fascism? Current housing facilities for…

eContribution

By Daniela Zordova

A Take on Slovakia’s Same-Sex Referendum

*** Do you agree only the union of a man and a woman can be called marriage? *** Do you agree that it should not be permitted for same-sex couples to adopt children? *** Should parents have the right to remove their children from sex education in schools?Last Saturday (07 February), Slovakia held an absurd referendum worthy of praise from only the most religiously political regimes and yet reflects to the European and international publics the mentality of Slovaks when it comes to social…

eContribution

By Abubakar Siddique for RFE/RL

Are The Taliban Terrorists?

Many were surprised when a White House spokesman recently called the Afghan Taliban an "armed insurgency" and refrained from calling the hardline militant group terrorists a month after the United States ended combat operations in Afghanistan. The United States lost more than 2,000 soldiers in its 13-year war against the Taliban after it led an international coalition to topple their regime in Afghanistan in late 2001. The Taliban were accused of harboring Al-Qaeda, and a day after thousands…

Editors desk

By Mitchell Belfer

Announcement Regarding the Withdrawal of 'Macedonian Ambassador's Son "Kidnapped in Prague"'

Dear Readers, Please note that a commentary article entitled, 'Macedonian Ambassador's Son "Kidnapped in Prague,"' (31 October 2012) by Aneta Speldova was withdrawn in January 2013 following new information that challenged the original assertions by the former Macedonian Ambassador to the Czech Republic. The decision to withdraw the article in 2013 was taken by CEJISS management without outside consultation. CEJISS asserts that it bears no responsibility for republications of its materials.…

eContribution

By Abubakar Siddique, Qasim Khan Mandokhel and Ghulam Ghaus for RFE/RL

Pakistan's Minority Provinces Oppose Changes To China Trade Route

A series of major Chinese-financed infrastructure and development projects expected to change Pakistan's economic landscape has run into controversy. Leaders from two of Pakistan's minority provinces have called on the country's dominant eastern province of Punjab to refrain from changing the route of the China-Pak Economic Corridor. The 2,000-kilometer rail and road link will connect western China to Pakistan's newly developed Arabian Sea seaport, Gwadar. Politicians in the underdeveloped…

eContribution

By Sofia Vasilyeva (CEJISS)

Prague Vigil for Paris Victims

The events that have unfolded in Paris over the past days should act as a wake-up call in terms of European solidarity. It is not enough to talk the talk of a European Union that responds to the needs - both material and immaterial - of its members and its members citizens, Europe must truly, and unashamedly, walk the walk. The tragedy in Paris is felt throughout Europe sharply.

Muslim Nationalism and the New Turks

Book review

By Ahmet Gencturk, (Panteion University, Greece)

Muslim Nationalism and the New Turks

Since the popularisation of neo-liberalism in the late 1970’s the centricity of the nation-state has faced a comprehensive challenge. A key criticism holds that the nation-state is, by its very nature, incompatible with the concept of democracy since it seeks to create homogenous political communities. Adopting a more Western understanding of nation-state building, late (19th and early 20th century) Ottoman and, later, Kemalists followed a top-down approach. Islamism, which stands in…

Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous than Others

Book review

By Katerina Kjirovska (independent)

Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous than Others

James Gilligan, in his book Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous than Others, sets out to solve a mystery: a murder mystery. He claims that ‘as cigarette smoking has been shown to increase the rates of lung cancer, so the presence of a Republican in the White House increases the rates of suicide and homicide.’ It is significant that the author of this book is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of New York whose aim was conducting research on suicide and homicide and…

Sexual Violence as a Weapon of War? Perceptions, Prescriptions, Problems in the Congo and Beyond

Book review

By Katerina Krulisova (Nottingham Trent University)

Sexual Violence as a Weapon of War? Perceptions, Prescriptions, Problems in the Congo and Beyond

  The academic and political recognition of sexual violence as a weapon of war undoubtedly marks a historical success of the activism of the feminist movement, widely defined. Sexual violence during armed conflicts represents an acute, and serious, global security problem that requires a coordinated policy action—such action, however, is only possible via prior recognition of the phenomenon as a threat and the subsequent securitisation of it. By moving from the unproblematic side-lining of…

The Hybridity of Terrorism

Book review

By Michael Becker (Northeastern University)

The Hybridity of Terrorism

  In recent decades, as the incidence and deadliness of terrorism have grown, so too has the academic literature on the causes, nature, and consequences of the phenomenon. In The Hybridity of Terrorism, Sebastian Wojciechowski proposes a new lens through which to understand terrorism. Breaking it down into several constituent parts (subject, actors, forms, causes, spaces, and features), each of which is the subject of one chapter, Wojciechowski argues persuasively that terrorism cannot be…

The Horn of Africa (Hot Spots in Global Politics)

Book review

By Kateřina Struhová

The Horn of Africa (Hot Spots in Global Politics)

  In The Horn of Africa Kidane Mengisteab, comprehensively introduces readers to the complex socio-political situation of the region. The book’s title may be somehow confusing for some readers, as traditionally the region consists of Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and entities that emerged within Somalia. Mengisteab’s book however, covers a wider region – the so-called the Greater Horn of Africa – by adding Sudan, South Sudan, Kenya and Uganda to the previously listed countries.  The region is,…

2014 - Volume 8, Issue 4